Domperidone, Reglan, and Gastroparesis

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Domperidone (also known as Motilium) has gotten a number of reputations in the medical community and is often followed by a long list of rumors about FDA approval as well as side effects. In patents with Gastroparesis, Domperidone is often used to treat symptoms of nausea, vomiting, bloating, and helps aid in encouraging gastric motility. Due to the fact that Domperidone is not FDA approved, many doctors in the United States refuse to treat Gastroparesis by prescribing Domperidone and often chose instead to push Gastroparesis patients towards using the drug Reglan. It’s important for patients with Gastroparesis to know and understand what the facts and side effects are for Domperidone so that the patients themselves can make an informed decision about what may or may not be right for their body.

In some smaller countries all over the world doctors have encouraged the use of Domperidone being given to pregnant woman who are experiencing a decline in the amount of breast milk that they are producing. One of the side effects of taking Domperidone is that Domperidone causes an increase in the hormone called prolactin. Domperidone stimulates the hormone Prolactin in the female breast and causes woman to lactate or increase in lactation. Janssen Pharmaceutical (the company that’s responsible for creating Domperidone) has attempted on several occasions to get the FDA’s drug approval for legal distribution in the United States. After several failed attempts, the FDA sent Janssen Pharmaceutical a statement about the concerns of Domperidone being used as a method of increasing breast milk in expectant mothers. Though Domperidone was not created for the purpose of being used to increase breast milk in mothers and expectant mothers, the concern is that it would be used for that purpose and would be legally easily obtainable.
As stated by The Mayo Clinic, the side effects of Domperidone are as follows: “Difficulty in speaking, Disorientation, Dizziness, Fainting, Irregular heartbeat, Light-headedness, and Loss of balance or muscle control. Less common side effects are loss of balance or muscle control, and swelling of the mouth and rare symptoms include, fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse and swelling of face, hands, lower legs, or feet (see http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/drug-information/DR600561/DSECTION=side-effects for more information).” Due to the fact that these symptoms (though rarely life threatening) can become serious, the FDA found it difficult to approve Domperidone because expectant mothers, and mothers with young children can intravenously pass along varying amounts the medication of Domperidone from their breast to their child.
Domperidone overdosing can lead to a number of complications and can even cause spontaneous death. However, small amounts of Domperidone at low doses have had great success in treating the symptoms that is caused by Gastroparesis and is well-known for being far safer than its competitor known as Reglan. Unlike Reglan, Domperidone doesn’t cross the blood-brain barrier causing severe neurological side effects (that are all too often irreversible). Reglan- though FDA approved, is not approved for long term treatment of chronic conditions like Gastroparesis due to the fact that it causes neurological brain damage. It is highly encouraged not to take Reglan for any more than three months. Reglan is a black label medication due to the fact that that when it’s taken for an extended period of time it can cause a disease called Tardive Dyskinesia that results in the involuntary movements of the hands, legs, face, tongue, and other extremities which is irreversible. Reglan can also be very hard on other organs such as difficulty breathing in the lungs, kidney damage, Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (a serious, life threatening brain disorder). Reglan can also cause fluid retention in the blood, and increase depression and suicidal thoughts or tendencies. Choosing to stop taking Reglan can also prove to be problematic as the body and more specifically, the brain can become dependent on the medication and the patient with Gastroparesis can suffer serious withdrawals.
Another issue with Domperidone is that due to the fact that it isn’t FDA approved, many Doctors and hospitals choose not to promote it or prescribe it because they don’t reap the profits from the drug company. Both drugs have positive and negative effects on the body which is why it’s very important to find a doctor who is honestly looking out for your best interest. There are many times where the benefits of taking a medication outweighs the risk so it’s important to do your own research to come up with a plan that’s right for you and your body. Whether you chose Domperidone or Reglan for your treatment plan is completely up to you and your physician. You know your body better than anyone else and when you do the research for yourself, you can become aware of the risks which will help aid you in creating a treatment plan with your doctor that is right by YOU and you alone.
Note** I am not a physician, please do not stop or start taking any medications without your physician’s permission.
If you are interested in taking Domperidone and have gone through the proper channels of getting an EKG and running it by your doctor and are looking for a place to buy and import it without having to have a prescription sent overseas, You can buy it by clicking on the following link. This link was given to me personally by my own physician at The Mayo Clinic and is one of the fastest and least expensive places to buy it. It’s imported and shipped to you in a span of two weeks and you can buy 500 pills for $60.00 American dollars. It is not illegal to import Domperidone for medical purposes (being the reason why my physician gave me all the information on where to buy it). In this link, the Domperidone you would be buying would be directly imported from the pharmacy in the UK. https://www.inhousepharmacy.biz/search.aspx?searchterm=vomistop
Note: Domperidone is taken 3-4 times a day 30-40 minuets before eating a meal.
Works Cited
“Domperidone.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 08 Mar. 2013. Web. 03 Aug. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domperidone&gt;.
FDA. “Domperidone.” FDA Alert:. FDA, 10 June 2004. Web. 03 Aug. 2013. <http://www.drugs.com/fda/domperidone-80.html&gt;.
FDA. “Domperidone FDA Approval.” Petition. FDA, n.d. Web. 03 Aug. 2013. <http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/domperidone-fda/&gt;.
FDA. “Drugs.” FDA Talk Paper: FDA Warns Against Women Using Unapproved Drug, Domperidone, to Increase Milk Production. FDA, 7 June 2004. Web. 03 Aug. 2013. <http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/InformationbyDrugClass/ucm173886.htm&gt;.
FDA. “Drugs.” How To Obtain Domperidone. FDA, 18 May 2005. Web. 03 Aug. 2013. <http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/InformationbyDrugClass/ucm073070.htm&gt;.
Maltbee, Kirk. “How Does Motilium Help in Acid Reflux? | EHow.” EHow. Demand Media, 22 May 2009. Web. 03 Aug. 2013. <http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5042488_motilium-acid-reflux.html&gt;.
Micromedex, Drug Information Provided By:. “Domperidone (Oral Route).” Mayo Clinic. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 01 June 2012. Web. 03 Aug. 2013. <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/drug-information/DR600561/DSECTION=side-effects&gt;.
“Reglan Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing – WebMD.” WebMD. WebMD, 2005. Web. 03 Aug. 2013. <http://www.webmd.com/drugs/drug-6177-Reglan Oral.aspx?drugid=6177>.
“Reglan.” Pdrhealth. Pdrhealth, 2013. Web. 03 Aug. 2013. <http://www.pdrhealth.com/drugs/reglan&gt;.

7 responses to “Domperidone, Reglan, and Gastroparesis

  1. Your style is so unique in comparison to other people I’ve read stuff from. I appreciate you for posting when you have the opportunity, Guess I’ll just
    book mark this web site.

  2. Love the matter of fact way you’re describing these two meds and giving resources to do more research. Informed patients lead to better decisions. :)

  3. I have used both drugs & now have irreversible tremors & drop things. Gutta weigh the pro’s & con’s & that is just the side effects I got.

  4. Colleen Suddath

    I take domperidone which is prescribed to me by my GI Dr and I live in the state of Georgia in the US…I get my domperidone at my local compound pharmacy right up the street and it is available at any compound pharmacy in the US by prescription but because it is not FDA approved your insurance will not pay for it…cost will vary from state to state but my cost is about $65. A month…thought this info was helpful.

    • Hi Colleen, I am surprised that compound pharmacies will compound domperidone. I know when I first got on it about 7 years ago they compounded it but then quit around 2008 here in Memphis. I’m going to check this avenue out and see if I can get mine compounded locally. I have been ordering from New Zealand at inhousepharmacy.biz but recently got a batch that has gluten in it and I have Celiac disease and my body can’t tolerate gluten so this has been a major problem for me. Would you be willing to tell me which compounding pharmacy you use in case i can’t find it here locally? My daughter lives in the Atlanta area so I visit that area often.
      thanks.
      Vickie

  5. I’m also from Georgia and get my domperidone from a local compounding pharmacy. Reglan was the first drug that they prescribed for my gastroparesis, they did not mention the dangers from it. After a month I developed signs of Tardive Dyskensia, when I stopped the medication it only got worse. I was having full body spasms with involuntary grunting noises, now over two years later I still have some slight spasms. My doctor told me that since it hasn’t stopped by now, that it will most likely be permanent. Now I try to warn everyone about the potential dangers of Reglan.

  6. I’m in Georgia too, I get mine from the UK from Blue Sky Drugs, I’ve been onit over four years and have had no issues.
    Thanks for the info, been following you for a while.

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